Silver Moon, ex Rio de Janeiro to Fort Lauderdale

Cruise Line
Silversea Cruises
Ship
Silver Moon
Cruise Departs
24 Feb 2021
Cruise Duration
21 Nights
Embark Ship
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Disembark Ship
Ft Lauderdale (Pt Everglades), USA
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Interior Oceanview Balcony Suite
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Cruise Itinerary

DateActivityArriveDepart
24 Feb 2021
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
overnight
25 Feb 2021
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
01:00 PM
26 Feb 2021 At sea    
27 Feb 2021
Salvador de Bahia, Brazil
12:00 PM 11:00 PM
28 Feb 2021 At sea    
01 Mar 2021
Recife, Brazil
08:00 AM 11:00 PM
02 Mar 2021 At sea    
03 Mar 2021
Fortaleza, Brazil
08:00 AM 07:00 PM
04 Mar 2021 At sea    
05 Mar 2021 At sea    
06 Mar 2021
Ile Royale, French Guiana
12:00 PM 06:00 PM
07 Mar 2021 At sea    
08 Mar 2021
Bridgetown, Barbados
08:00 AM 07:00 PM
09 Mar 2021
St Georges, Grenada
08:00 AM 07:00 PM
10 Mar 2021
Castries, St Lucia
08:00 AM 06:00 PM
11 Mar 2021
St Johns, Antigua & Barbuda
08:00 AM 06:00 PM
12 Mar 2021
Gustavia, St Barts
08:00 AM 11:00 PM
13 Mar 2021
San Juan, Puerto Rico
12:00 PM overnight
14 Mar 2021
San Juan, Puerto Rico
06:00 PM
15 Mar 2021 At sea    
16 Mar 2021 At sea    
17 Mar 2021
Ft Lauderdale (Pt Everglades), USA
07:00 AM

All itineraries and ports of call at the discretion of the cruise line subject to local weather conditions and may change without notice.

21 Night Cruise sailing from Rio de Janeiro to Fort Lauderdale onboard Silver Moon.

Leaving the sparkling shores of Florida in your wake, set sail for a Christmas to remember! Blue sky days replace frosty winter mornings, relaxed onboard pampering, Silversea style, replaces preparing lunch for everyone. Gather up friends and family and enjoy the pretty ports of the Caribbean and fun evenings onboard for some superb memories. Start a new family tradition and really enjoy the holiday season this year.

Highlights of this cruise:

Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Welcome to the Cidade Maravilhosa, or the Marvelous City, as Rio is known in Brazil. Synonymous with the girl from Ipanema, the dramatic views from Christ the Redeemer atop Corcovado mountain, and fabulously flamboyant Carnival celebrations, Rio is a city of stunning architecture, abundant museums, and marvelous food. Rio is also home to 23 beaches, an almost continuous 73-km (45-mile) ribbon of sand.As you leave the airport and head to Rio’s beautiful Zona Sul (the touristic South Zone), you’ll drive for about 40 minutes on a highway from where you’ll begin to get a sense of the dramatic contrast between beautiful landscape and devastating poverty. In this teeming metropolis of 12 million people (6.2 million of whom live in Rio proper), the very rich and the very poor live in uneasy proximity.

Salvador De Bahia, Brazil
According to Salvador’s adopted son Jorge Amado, “In Salvador, magic becomes part of the every-day.” From the shimmering golden light of sunset over the Baía do Todos os Santos, to the rhythmic beats that race along the streets, Salvador, while no longer Brazil’s capital, remains one of its most captivating cities. A large dose of its exoticism comes down to its African heritage—at least 70% of its 2,675,000 population is classified as Afro-Brazilian—and how it has blended into Brazil’s different strands, from the native Indians to the Christian colonizers. Salvadorans may tell you that you can visit a different church every day of the year, which is almost true—the city has about 300. Churches whose interiors are covered with gold leaf were financed by the riches of the Portuguese colonial era, when slaves masked their traditional religious beliefs under a thin Catholic veneer.

Fortaleza, Brazil
Called the “City of Light,” Fortaleza claims that the sun shines on it 2,800 hours a year. And it’s a good thing, too, as the coastline stretches far beyond the city. To the east, along the Litoral Leste or the Costa Sol Nascente (Sunrise Coast) are many fishing villages. To the west, along the Litoral Oeste or the Costa Sol Poente (Sunset Coast), there are pristine stretches of sand. The shores here are cooled by constant breezes and lapped by waters with an average temperature of 24°C (72°F).Today Fortaleza, a large, modern state capital with more than 2 million inhabitants, is Brazil’s fifth-largest city. It’s also on the move, with one of the country’s newest airports, a modern convention center, a huge cultural center with a planetarium, large shopping malls, several museums and theaters, and an abundance of sophisticated restaurants.

Ile Royale, French Guiana
Blessed with an abundance of wildlife, the first thing visitors to Ile Royale will notice will be the sea turtles feeding along the pier, the iguanas basking on rocks, and perhaps even the peacocks strolling along the road. At first glance, the island seems like paradise but scratch the surface and a much sombre past becomes clear. In fact, French Guiana was not always the tropical holiday destination it is today – far from it. During its penal colony days, being sent ‘en Guyane’ was the ultimate form of punishment, reserved primarily for the worst of France’s criminals (many will, of course, know the story of Henri Charriere aka Papillon, played by Steve McQueen in the film of the same name).

Bridgetown, Barbados
This bustling capital city is a major duty-free port with a compact shopping area. The principal thoroughfare is Broad Street, which leads west from National Heroes Square.Amongst top attractions here, the Pelican Villagea cluster of workshops located halfway between the cruise-ship terminal and downtown Bridgetown where craftspeople create and sell locally made leather goods, batik, basketry, carvings, jewelry, glass art, paintings, pottery, and other items. It’s open weekdays 9 to 5 and Saturday 9 to 2; things here are most active when cruise ships are in port.Alternatively, sightseers will want to go to the Nidhe Israel Synagogue, which has been providing for the spiritual needs of one of the oldest Jewish congregations in the Western Hemisphere. This synagogue was formed by Jews who left Brazil in the 1620s and introduced sugarcane to Barbados. The adjoining cemetery has tombstones dating from the 1630s. The original house of worship, built in 1654, was destroyed in an 1831 hurricane, rebuilt in 1833, and restored with the assistance of the Barbados National Trust in 1987. Friday-night services are held during the winter months, but the building is open to the public year-round. Shorts are not acceptable during services but may be worn at other times.

Castries (St. Lucia), Saint Lucia
With a lush interior featuring towering mountains, dense rain forest, fertile valleys, and acres of banana plantations, St. Lucia is mostly distinguished by the Pitons—twin peaks that soar high above the ocean floor on the southwest coast. Whether you stay in Soufrière, in the north in or around Rodney Bay Village, or even farther north at Cap Estate, exploring the iconic natural sights—and local history—in Soufrière is a day well spent. Except for a small area in the extreme northeast, one main highway circles all of St. Lucia. The road snakes along the coast, cuts across mountains, makes hairpin turns and sheer drops, and reaches dizzying heights. It takes at least four hours to drive the whole loop. Even at a leisurely pace with frequent sightseeing stops, and whether you’re driving or being driven, the curvy roads make it a tiring drive in a single outing.

St. John’s, Antigua and Barbuda
Antigua’s capital, with some 45,000 inhabitants (approximately half the island’s population), lies at sea level at the inland end of a sheltered northwestern bay. Although it has seen better days, a couple of notable historic sights and some good waterfront shopping areas make it worth a visit. At the far south end of town, where Market Street forks into Valley and All Saints roads, haggling goes on every Friday and Saturday, when locals jam the Public Market to buy and sell fruits, vegetables, fish, and spices. Ask before you aim a camera; your subject may expect a tip. This is old-time Caribbean shopping, a jambalaya of sights, sounds, and smells.

Gustavia (St. Barthelemy), Guadeloupe
You can easily explore all of Gustavia during a two-hour stroll. Some shops close from noon to 3 or 4, so plan lunch accordingly, but stores stay open past 7 in the evening. Parking in Gustavia is a challenge, especially during vacation times. A good spot to park is rue de la République, alongside the catamarans, yachts, and sailboats.

San Juan, Puerto Rico
If you associate Puerto Rico’s capital with the colonial streets of Old San Juan, then you know only part of the picture. San Juan is a major metropolis, radiating out from the bay on the Atlantic Ocean that was discovered by Juan Ponce de León. More than a third of the island’s nearly 4 million citizens proudly call themselves sanjuaneros. The city may be rooted in the past, but it has its eye on the future. Locals go about their business surrounded by colonial architecture and towering modern structures.By 1508 the explorer Juan Ponce de León had established a colony in an area now known as Caparra, southeast of present-day San Juan. He later moved the settlement north to a more hospitable peninsular location. In 1521, after he became the first colonial governor, Ponce de León switched the name of the island—which was then called San Juan Bautista in honor of St. John the Baptist—with that of the settlement of Puerto Rico (“rich port”).Defended by the imposing Castillo San Felipe del Morro (El Morro) and Castillo San Cristóbal, Puerto Rico’s administrative and population center remained firmly in Spain’s hands until 1898, when it came under U.S. control after the Spanish-American War. Centuries of Spanish rule left an indelible imprint on the city, particularly in the walled area now known as Old San Juan. The area is filled with cobblestone streets and brightly painted, colonial-era structures, and its fortifications have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.Old San Juan is a monument to the past, but most of the rest of the city is planted firmly in the 21st century and draws migrants island-wide and from farther afield to jobs in its businesses and industries. The city captivates residents and visitors alike with its vibrant lifestyle as well as its balmy beaches, pulsing nightclubs, globe-spanning restaurants, and world-class museums. Once you set foot in this city, you may never want to leave.

Fort Lauderdale (Florida), United States
Like many southeast Florida neighbors, Fort Lauderdale has long been revitalizing. In a state where gaudy tourist zones often stand aloof from workaday downtowns, Fort Lauderdale exhibits consistency at both ends of the 2-mile Las Olas corridor. The sparkling look results from upgrades both downtown and on the beachfront. Matching the downtown’s innovative arts district, cafés, and boutiques is an equally inventive beach area, with hotels, cafés, and shops facing an undeveloped shoreline, and new resort-style hotels replacing faded icons of yesteryear. Despite wariness of pretentious overdevelopment, city leaders have allowed a striking number of glittering high-rises. Nostalgic locals and frequent visitors fret over the diminishing vision of sailboats bobbing in waters near downtown; however, Fort Lauderdale remains the yachting capital of the world, and the water toys don’t seem to be going anywhere.

Building on the phenomenal success of Silver Muse, Silver Moon – to be delivered August 2020 – will mirror her sister ship and will establish a new era of Silversea. At 40,700 gross tons and with a capacity to accommodate 596 passengers on board, Silver Moon will maintain the small-ship intimacy and spacious all-suite accommodation which are the hallmarks of the Silversea experience. Get ready – a new moon is coming.

Ship Profile & Stats

  • Length: 212.8 m
  • Tonnage: 40,700
  • Maiden Voyage: 2020
  • Passenger Capacity (dbl): 596
  • Officer Nationality: European
  • Ship Registration: Bahamas

Ship Amenities

  • Slippers
  • Unlimited Standard Wifi
  • Two 42 “ / 106 cm Flat-screen HD TV
  • Interactive Media Library
  • iHome Radio / Alarm charging station (with USB cable or Qi wireless charging), NFC Bluetooth connectivity
  • Dedicated butler
  • Wall mounted USB-C mobile device chargers
  • Refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your preferences

Ship Facilities

  • Arts Cafe
  • Dolce Vita
  • Connoisseur’s Corner
  • Panorama Lounge
  • Pool Deck & Jacuzzi Area
  • Fitness Centre
  • Tor’s Observation Library
  • Boutique
  • Zagara Beauty Salon
  • Zagara Beauty Spa
  • Casino
  • Venetian Lounge
  • La Terrazza
  • The Grill
  • Atlantide
  • Kaiseki
  • Spaccanapoli
  • Silver Note

Art inspires. Awakens your emotions and stimulates your thoughts.

In the quiet calm of morning, your private veranda becomes a place of true inspiration. Surrounded by the magnificence of the dawning day, at one with the vista of sea and sky, in awe of nature and the vast beauty of this world. The shoreline of the next port slides closer and closer into view, and with it an undeniable anticipation of things to come and the promise of limitless possibilities.

Silversea creates exceptional ocean journeys with unique opportunities to explore remote ports-of-call from an intimate haven of incomparable luxury, each voyage a unique masterpiece. Discover genuine European expertise reflected in every detail, from our tranquil all-suite accommodation and uncompromising service to distinctive fine dining and a carefree all-inclusive philosophy.

Our guests hail from across the globe, yet share an appreciation for the spectrum of choice offered in Silversea’s array of exotic destinations and exclusive explorations ashore. By blending these elements together with enrichment experiences, each new port becomes more than a destination, it becomes a state of mind, transcending the traditional concepts of cruising. It is this distinction that has earned Silversea the reputation of World’s Best.

ALL-INCLUSIVE VALUE

COMPLIMENTARY BEVERAGES SERVED THROUGHOUT THE SHIP An extensive selection of fine wines, champagne, spirits, bottled water and soft drinks are yours to enjoy — all courtesy of Silversea.

IN-SUITE BEVERAGE CABINET STOCKED WITH OUR COMPLIMENTS Besides the chilled bottle of champagne that awaits you, every suite features a beverage cabinet stocked with your preferred assortment of complimentary beverages.

COMPLIMENTARY IN-SUITE DINING AND 24-HOUR ROOM SERVICE A formal dinner served course-by-course, a late-night snack, or a full breakfast delivered at your request — with no charge and no tipping.

COMPLIMENTARY SILVERSEA EXPERIENCE® A shoreside event exclusively for Silversea guests on select voyages. Recent outings have included dinner in the desert in Namibia and a concert at the ruins of Ephesus.

A FULL SPECTRUM OF ENTERTAINMENT AND ENRICHMENT Production shows, classical concerts, and folkloric performances. Multi-tiered show lounge. Lectures by world affairs experts, renowned authors and destination specialists.

COMPLIMENTARY TRANSPORTATION INTO TOWN Roundtrip transportation from the pier to the heart of town in most ports of call.

Silversea … The art of travel. The art of good living.

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vid: 14660 | cfid: 84252-cruise