Orient Pandaw, Mandalay Pagan Packet Upstream ex Pagan to Mandalay

Cruise Line
Pandaw Cruises
Ship
Orient Pandaw
Cruise Departs
09 Nov 2019
Other Dates
Cruise Duration
7 Nights
Embark Ship
Pagan, Myanmar
Disembark Ship
Mandalay, Myanmar
Enquire Now
Interior Oceanview Balcony Suite
Request Price Request Price Request Price Request Price

Cruise Itinerary

DateActivityArriveDepart
09 Nov 2019
Pagan, Myanmar
10 Nov 2019
Pagan, Myanmar
11 Nov 2019
Salay, Myanmar
12 Nov 2019
Pakkoku, Myanmar
13 Nov 2019
Yandabo, Myanmar
14 Nov 2019
Sagaing, Myanmar
15 Nov 2019
Mingun, Myanmar
16 Nov 2019
Mandalay, Myanmar

All itineraries and ports of call at the discretion of the cruise line subject to local weather conditions and may change without notice.

7 Night cruise sailing from Pagan to Mandalay onboard Orient Pandaw.

A fabulous way to discover the mighty Irrawaddy River aboard a Pandaw with up to two weekly departures between the historic royal capitals with two nights moored at Pagan and three at Mandalay as well as exploring small towns and villages of lost Burma in between.

DAY 1 PAGAN
Embark the ship for lunch followed by exploration of a selection of the 3000 plus Pagan monuments by bicycle or coach.

The first temple visited is Ananda, known as the finest temple in Pagan in terms of ancient architecture, built in AD 1105 by King Kyansit Thar, the third king of Pagan dynasty. Explore the high standard of Pagan craftsmanship including niches with statues, glazed plaques, the standing Buddha statues and murals.

Next stop is Myingabar Gubyaukgyi temple built in AD 1113 by Prince Rajakumar, son of King Kyansit Thar. Discover the well-preserved murals which also depict typical day-to-day life in Pagan.

End the day with a walk through Phwar Saw Village; a small village with just over 500 inhabitants situated between New Pagan and Nyaung U airport. It was named after the very famous and influential queen for three consecutive Kings in Pagan’s late 13th century. The villagers rely on bean and pea farming, breeding cattle and producing small lacquerware handicrafts. A short stroll in the village under the shimmering sunshine in the late afternoon is the perfect way to capture the villagers’ way of life including fetching water, herding cattle back home and preparing for dinner.

Moor overnight Pagan.

DAY 2 PAGAN
Further exploration of Pagan and visit a lacquerware workshop. Visit to Shwe San Daw stupa, one of only a few monuments allowing travellers to climb it, gaining a 360-degree view over the pagoda-studded plain. The next visit is to Shwe Zi Gone Pagoda, built in AD 1086 and believed to enshrine a hair relic of the Buddha.

Before returning to the ship for lunch, take a stroll around the Khay Min Ga pagoda complex to learn about the different architectural styles: Indian, Sri Lankan, Myanmar-Mon hybrid and Myanmar.

In the afternoon, visit a Lacquerware workshop to explore the process of making lacquer handicrafts which is the specialty craft of Pagan.

Continue to the unique Payathonezu, three inter-connected temples with a narrow passage built in the late 13th century.

End the day with a visit to Dhamayangyi from AD 1170, the widest and largest temple in Pagan.

Watch the sunset from the top of Taung Guni temple before returning to the ship.

Overnight Pagan.

DAY 3 SALAY – AYARDAW – TANT-CHI-TAUNG
Set sail early morning to Salay, a small town which was once a bustling trading port, now a sleepy village filled with colonial architectural treasures and timeless teak monasteries.

Walk to Yoke-Sone Kyaung, the best-known teak carved monastery in Burma, stopping at Salay House on return.

Sail upriver to the Ayardaw charity clinic supported by Pandaw then drive up the winding road of the Tant-Chi-Taung mountain to visit the hill-top stupa.

Late afternoon, watch the traditional paper-mache elephant dance performed by the villagers from Tant-Chi.

Moor overnight near Nyaung U.

DAY 4 PAKOKKU
Explore Pakokku, experiencing the local market and town centre by Tuk Tuk.

Pakkoku is a city of about 100,000 inhabitants located 30 km from Pagan. Main produce are tobacco, cotton, peanuts, Thanatkha (traditional make-up and sun lotion) and textiles. Visit Pakokku’s main market by Tuk Tuk.

Stop at a cheroot workshop and discover how traditional cheroot cigars are made.

Moor overnight at Aung Pan Chaung near the Chindwin confluence.

DAY 5 YANDABO
Explore Yandabo village, famous for its production of terracotta pottery from the river bank clay.

This village is well-known as the place where the first Anglo-Burmese war ended by the peace treaty signed in 1826. Morning walking tour and a visit to a pottery workshop to see first-hand the production process. This is a hands-on experience which you are welcome to try.

Visit the Pandaw supported Yandabo School (if no school holidays).

Afternoon sailing and moor overnight at Pauk-taw Pauk-myaing village near Ava.

DAY 6 AVA – SAGAING – AMARAPURA
Morning visit to the ancient city of Ava, which served as the capital of the Burmese kingdom for nearly 400 years, longer than any other ancient capital. Morning tour by coach to Ava jetty and across the Myit Nge(Dokehtawady) river by small ferry boat, followed by horse carts to Menu Oak Kyaung monastery built by the chief queen in 1822. End the morning with a visit to the splendid Bagaya Kyaung monastery built entirely of teak in 1834.

Afternoon excursion to Sagaing where there are 1000 hermitages and sanctuaries rich in woodcarving and religious art. From Sagaing Hill admire the bird’s eye view over the Irrawaddy river curving around Sagaing from Soon U Ponnya Shin hill top-pagoda. Later an introduction to the Buddhist nuns’ way of life at a nunnery.

Drive to Amarapura, a former capital (initially from 1783 to 1819 and subsequently from 1839 to 1852). Visit a silk and cotton weaving workshop, Amarapura’s major business.

At sunset take a local boat on Taungthaman lake at U Bein Bridge, the world’s longest teak bridge.

Moor overnight at Sagaing.

DAY 7 MINGUN – MANDALAY
Set sail to Mingun for a morning walking tour around the unfinished stupa built by Amarapura’s King Bodawpaya in 1790 which was intended to be the world’s largest stupa but remained unfinished since 1808 and also visit the world’s largest ringing bell. Drive to Mandalay in the afternoon. Mandalay is not only the country’s second largest city but also the religious centre of Burmese culture. Read More…

DAY 8 MANDALAY
By 09:00am disembark in Mandalay.

Each ship, hand finished in brass and teak by traditional craftsmen are in themselves objects of great beauty. The secret of our success is that on our ships, whilst luxury and comfort are discreetly present, it is the colonial character and friendly atmosphere that predominate. All our Pandaws have ultra shallow drafts and can travel to remote areas, which would be unreachable by other vessels, let alone overland.

Sailing on a Pandaw is essentially an outdoor experience. Whilst the staterooms are very comfortable and roomy, passengers prefer to spend their time sitting outside, on the promenade decks or on the vast observation deck above. Unlike other cruise ships every window (except port holes on lower deck) can open.

When sailing our passengers sit on deck and become absorbed by great panoramas as they unfold about them. Spellbound, one cannot help but to meditate upon the unceasing human and wildlife activity of these teaming water worlds.

The Pandaw dining rooms are designed to open up along the sides and only at night do we close them up and use air conditioning. We know our passengers want fresh air not chilled air.

Ship Profile & Stats

  • Length: 55 m
  • Maiden Voyage: 2008
  • Passenger Capacity (dbl): 60
  • Crew Nationality: Asian
  • Officer Nationality: Asian
  • Dining Staff Nationality: Asian

Ship Amenities

  • 230 volts two round pin type as found in Continental Europe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Individually Controlled Air Conditioning
  • Kimonos and Slippers
  • Spa Branded Amenities
  • Unlimited Mineral Water

Ship Facilities

  • Bakery
  • Dining Room
  • Sun Deck
  • Onboard Laundry
  • Complimentary coffee, water, tea, soft drinks, local beer, local spirits, juices

A Pandaw river expedition is not like an ocean going cruise. There is no dressing up for dinner and no ‘captain’s table’.

The atmosphere on board is very friendly and informal, more like a party on a private yacht than a cruise ship. Nearly everything is included in the price and there are no hidden extras for excursions.. Even your drinks are included in the price of your ticket. There is an incredibly high level of personal service and care aboard, with a crew passenger ratio of 1:2. For these reasons passengers keep coming back and exploring more of a lost South-East Asia.

Sailing on a Pandaw is essentially an outdoor experience. Whilst the staterooms are very comfortable and roomy, passengers prefer to spend their time sitting outside, on the promenade decks or on the vast observation deck above. Unlike other cruise ships every window (except port holes on the lower deck) can open.

When sailing passengers sit on deck and become absorbed by great panoramas as they unfold about them. Spellbound, one cannot help but to meditate upon the unceasing human and wildlife activity of these teaming water worlds.

Select the Cabin to view detail.

* Unless otherwise noted all pricing is on a per person twin share basis. All prices based on cash payment - credit card fees may apply. Cruise deposit, amendment and cancellation conditions apply. Special conditions may apply - please ask for full details at time of enquiry. All passports, vaccinations and visas are the responsibility of the travelling guest to secure prior to departure from Australia. Any pricing not in Australian Dollars will be converted on the day of payment into the relevant currency based on our daily rate of exchange. Please note that many of the prices shown on this website are not shown in real time. Whilst we endeavour to keep our pricing as up-to-date as possible, the advertised prices shown here may differ slightly from the live prices in our booking system. All pricing and offers are subject to availability at time of booking. Whilst all information is correct at the time of publication, offers are subject to change. We reserve the right to correct errors without penalty. Please submit any data errors/omissions you may notice on this site.

Unless otherwise expressly noted, all materials, including images, illustrations, designs, icons, and photographs appearing anywhere on this website are protected by worldwide copyright laws and treaty provisions. The copyright on such materials is held by the original creator of the materials. None of the materials may be copied, reproduced, displayed, modified, published, uploaded, posted, transmitted or distributed in whole or in part in any form or by any means other than as provided by Cruise Factory and Cruise Traveller to its clients, or with the prior written permission of Cruise Factory and Cruise Traveller. All rights not expressly granted in these Terms are reserved. Any unauthorised use of the materials appearing on this website may violate copyright, trademark and other applicable laws and could result in criminal or civil penalties.

vid: 13980 | cfid: 82950-cruise

Orient Pandaw, Mandalay Pagan Packet Upstream ex Pagan to Mandalay

Cruise Line
Pandaw Cruises
Ship
Orient Pandaw
Cruise Departs
09 Nov 2019
Other Dates
Cruise Duration
7 Nights
Embark Ship
Pagan, Myanmar
Disembark Ship
Mandalay, Myanmar
Enquire Now
Interior Oceanview Balcony Suite
Request Price Request Price Request Price Request Price

Cruise Itinerary

DateActivityArriveDepart
09 Nov 2019
Pagan, Myanmar
10 Nov 2019
Pagan, Myanmar
11 Nov 2019
Salay, Myanmar
12 Nov 2019
Pakkoku, Myanmar
13 Nov 2019
Yandabo, Myanmar
14 Nov 2019
Sagaing, Myanmar
15 Nov 2019
Mingun, Myanmar
16 Nov 2019
Mandalay, Myanmar

All itineraries and ports of call at the discretion of the cruise line subject to local weather conditions and may change without notice.

7 Night Cruise sailing from Pagan to Mandalay aboard Orient Pandaw.

A fabulous way to discover the mighty Irrawaddy River aboard a Pandaw with up to two weekly departures between the historic royal capitals with two nights moored at Pagan and three at Mandalay as well as exploring small towns and villages of lost Burma in between.

DAY 1 PAGAN
Embark the ship for lunch followed by exploration of a selection of the 3000 plus Pagan monuments by bicycle or coach.

The first temple visited is Ananda, known as the finest temple in Pagan in terms of ancient architecture, built in AD 1105 by King Kyansit Thar, the third king of Pagan dynasty. Explore the high standard of Pagan craftsmanship including niches with statues, glazed plaques, the standing Buddha statues and murals.

Next stop is Myingabar Gubyaukgyi temple built in AD 1113 by Prince Rajakumar, son of King Kyansit Thar. Discover the well-preserved murals which also depict typical day-to-day life in Pagan.

End the day with a walk through Phwar Saw Village; a small village with just over 500 inhabitants situated between New Pagan and Nyaung U airport. It was named after the very famous and influential queen for three consecutive Kings in Pagan’s late 13th century. The villagers rely on bean and pea farming, breeding cattle and producing small lacquerware handicrafts. A short stroll in the village under the shimmering sunshine in the late afternoon is the perfect way to capture the villagers’ way of life including fetching water, herding cattle back home and preparing for dinner.

Moor overnight Pagan.

DAY 2 PAGAN
Further exploration of Pagan and visit a lacquerware workshop. Visit to Shwe San Daw stupa, one of only a few monuments allowing travellers to climb it, gaining a 360-degree view over the pagoda-studded plain. The next visit is to Shwe Zi Gone Pagoda, built in AD 1086 and believed to enshrine a hair relic of the Buddha.

Before returning to the ship for lunch, take a stroll around the Khay Min Ga pagoda complex to learn about the different architectural styles: Indian, Sri Lankan, Myanmar-Mon hybrid and Myanmar.

In the afternoon, visit a Lacquerware workshop to explore the process of making lacquer handicrafts which is the specialty craft of Pagan.

Continue to the unique Payathonezu, three inter-connected temples with a narrow passage built in the late 13th century.

End the day with a visit to Dhamayangyi from AD 1170, the widest and largest temple in Pagan.

Watch the sunset from the top of Taung Guni temple before returning to the ship.

Overnight Pagan.

DAY 3 SALAY – AYARDAW – TANT-CHI-TAUNG
Set sail early morning to Salay, a small town which was once a bustling trading port, now a sleepy village filled with colonial architectural treasures and timeless teak monasteries.

Walk to Yoke-Sone Kyaung, the best-known teak carved monastery in Burma, stopping at Salay House on return.

Sail upriver to the Ayardaw charity clinic supported by Pandaw then drive up the winding road of the Tant-Chi-Taung mountain to visit the hill-top stupa.

Late afternoon, watch the traditional paper-mache elephant dance performed by the villagers from Tant-Chi.

Moor overnight near Nyaung U.

DAY 4 PAKOKKU
Explore Pakokku, experiencing the local market and town centre by Tuk Tuk.

Pakkoku is a city of about 100,000 inhabitants located 30 km from Pagan. Main produce are tobacco, cotton, peanuts, Thanatkha (traditional make-up and sun lotion) and textiles. Visit Pakokku’s main market by Tuk Tuk.

Stop at a cheroot workshop and discover how traditional cheroot cigars are made.

Moor overnight at Aung Pan Chaung near the Chindwin confluence.

DAY 5 YANDABO
Explore Yandabo village, famous for its production of terracotta pottery from the river bank clay.

This village is well-known as the place where the first Anglo-Burmese war ended by the peace treaty signed in 1826. Morning walking tour and a visit to a pottery workshop to see first-hand the production process. This is a hands-on experience which you are welcome to try.

Visit the Pandaw supported Yandabo School (if no school holidays).

Afternoon sailing and moor overnight at Pauk-taw Pauk-myaing village near Ava.

DAY 6 AVA – SAGAING – AMARAPURA
Morning visit to the ancient city of Ava, which served as the capital of the Burmese kingdom for nearly 400 years, longer than any other ancient capital. Morning tour by coach to Ava jetty and across the Myit Nge(Dokehtawady) river by small ferry boat, followed by horse carts to Menu Oak Kyaung monastery built by the chief queen in 1822. End the morning with a visit to the splendid Bagaya Kyaung monastery built entirely of teak in 1834.

Afternoon excursion to Sagaing where there are 1000 hermitages and sanctuaries rich in woodcarving and religious art. From Sagaing Hill admire the bird’s eye view over the Irrawaddy river curving around Sagaing from Soon U Ponnya Shin hill top-pagoda. Later an introduction to the Buddhist nuns’ way of life at a nunnery.

Drive to Amarapura, a former capital (initially from 1783 to 1819 and subsequently from 1839 to 1852). Visit a silk and cotton weaving workshop, Amarapura’s major business.

At sunset take a local boat on Taungthaman lake at U Bein Bridge, the world’s longest teak bridge.

Moor overnight at Sagaing.

DAY 7 MINGUN – MANDALAY
Set sail to Mingun for a morning walking tour around the unfinished stupa built by Amarapura’s King Bodawpaya in 1790 which was intended to be the world’s largest stupa but remained unfinished since 1808 and also visit the world’s largest ringing bell. Drive to Mandalay in the afternoon. Mandalay is not only the country’s second largest city but also the religious centre of Burmese culture. Read More…

DAY 8 MANDALAY
By 09:00am disembark in Mandalay.

Each ship, hand finished in brass and teak by traditional craftsmen are in themselves objects of great beauty. The secret of our success is that on our ships, whilst luxury and comfort are discreetly present, it is the colonial character and friendly atmosphere that predominate. All our Pandaws have ultra shallow drafts and can travel to remote areas, which would be unreachable by other vessels, let alone overland.

Sailing on a Pandaw is essentially an outdoor experience. Whilst the staterooms are very comfortable and roomy, passengers prefer to spend their time sitting outside, on the promenade decks or on the vast observation deck above. Unlike other cruise ships every window (except port holes on lower deck) can open.

When sailing our passengers sit on deck and become absorbed by great panoramas as they unfold about them. Spellbound, one cannot help but to meditate upon the unceasing human and wildlife activity of these teaming water worlds.

The Pandaw dining rooms are designed to open up along the sides and only at night do we close them up and use air conditioning. We know our passengers want fresh air not chilled air.

Ship Profile & Stats

  • Length: 55 m
  • Maiden Voyage: 2008
  • Passenger Capacity (dbl): 60
  • Crew Nationality: Asian
  • Officer Nationality: Asian
  • Dining Staff Nationality: Asian

Ship Amenities

  • 230 volts two round pin type as found in Continental Europe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Individually Controlled Air Conditioning
  • Kimonos and Slippers
  • Spa Branded Amenities
  • Unlimited Mineral Water

Ship Facilities

  • Bakery
  • Dining Room
  • Sun Deck
  • Onboard Laundry
  • Complimentary coffee, water, tea, soft drinks, local beer, local spirits, juices

A Pandaw river expedition is not like an ocean going cruise. There is no dressing up for dinner and no ‘captain’s table’.

The atmosphere on board is very friendly and informal, more like a party on a private yacht than a cruise ship. Nearly everything is included in the price and there are no hidden extras for excursions.. Even your drinks are included in the price of your ticket. There is an incredibly high level of personal service and care aboard, with a crew passenger ratio of 1:2. For these reasons passengers keep coming back and exploring more of a lost South-East Asia.

Sailing on a Pandaw is essentially an outdoor experience. Whilst the staterooms are very comfortable and roomy, passengers prefer to spend their time sitting outside, on the promenade decks or on the vast observation deck above. Unlike other cruise ships every window (except port holes on the lower deck) can open.

When sailing passengers sit on deck and become absorbed by great panoramas as they unfold about them. Spellbound, one cannot help but to meditate upon the unceasing human and wildlife activity of these teaming water worlds.

Select the Cabin to view detail.

* Unless otherwise noted all pricing is on a per person twin share basis. All prices based on cash payment - credit card fees may apply. Cruise deposit, amendment and cancellation conditions apply. Special conditions may apply - please ask for full details at time of enquiry. All passports, vaccinations and visas are the responsibility of the travelling guest to secure prior to departure from Australia. Any pricing not in Australian Dollars will be converted on the day of payment into the relevant currency based on our daily rate of exchange. Please note that many of the prices shown on this website are not shown in real time. Whilst we endeavour to keep our pricing as up-to-date as possible, the advertised prices shown here may differ slightly from the live prices in our booking system. All pricing and offers are subject to availability at time of booking. Whilst all information is correct at the time of publication, offers are subject to change. We reserve the right to correct errors without penalty. Please submit any data errors/omissions you may notice on this site.

Unless otherwise expressly noted, all materials, including images, illustrations, designs, icons, and photographs appearing anywhere on this website are protected by worldwide copyright laws and treaty provisions. The copyright on such materials is held by the original creator of the materials. None of the materials may be copied, reproduced, displayed, modified, published, uploaded, posted, transmitted or distributed in whole or in part in any form or by any means other than as provided by Cruise Factory and Cruise Traveller to its clients, or with the prior written permission of Cruise Factory and Cruise Traveller. All rights not expressly granted in these Terms are reserved. Any unauthorised use of the materials appearing on this website may violate copyright, trademark and other applicable laws and could result in criminal or civil penalties.

vid: 12710 | cfid: 49093-cruise