Shadow, Voyage SS210325011 ex San Juan to Ft Lauderdale
Cruise Line Silversea Cruises
Ship Silver Shadow
Destination Caribbean
Nights 11
Departure Date 25 Mar 2021
Description 11 Night cruise sailing from San Juan to Ft Lauderdale onboard Silver Shadow.

Prepare to immerse yourself in the spectrum of seas so blue they enrich your soul. In colours and cultures so vivid they awaken your senses. In language, love and laughter so rich, they leave you with hungry for more. It may be the world’s favourite cruise destination, but travel with us on this 12-day voyage and we will show you what the real Caribbean is made up of.

Highlights of this cruise:

San Juan, Puerto Rico
If you associate Puerto Rico's capital with the colonial streets of Old San Juan, then you know only part of the picture. San Juan is a major metropolis, radiating out from the bay on the Atlantic Ocean that was discovered by Juan Ponce de León. More than a third of the island's nearly 4 million citizens proudly call themselves sanjuaneros. The city may be rooted in the past, but it has its eye on the future. Locals go about their business surrounded by colonial architecture and towering modern structures.

St. Kitts (Basseterre), Saint Kitts and Nevis
Mountainous St. Kitts, the first English settlement in the Leeward Islands, crams some stunning scenery into its 65 square miles (168 square km). Vast, brilliant green fields of sugarcane (the former cash crop, now slowly being replanted) run to the shore. The fertile, lush island has some fascinating natural and historical attractions: a rain forest replete with waterfalls, thick vines, and secret trails; a central mountain range dominated by the 3,792-foot Mt. Liamuiga, whose crater has long been dormant; and Brimstone Hill, known in the 18th century as the Gibraltar of the West Indies. St. Kitts and Nevis, along with Anguilla, achieved self-government as an associated state of Great Britain in 1967. In 1983 St. Kitts and Nevis became an independent nation. English with a strong West Indian lilt is spoken here. People are friendly but shy; always ask before you take photographs.

Fort-De-France, Martinique
The largest of the Windward Islands, Martinique is 4,261 mi (6,817 km) from Paris, but its spirit and language are decidedly French, with more than a soupçon of West Indian spice. Tangible, edible evidence of the fact is the island's cuisine, a superb blend of French and creole. Martinique is lushly landscaped with tropical flowers. Trees bend under the weight of fruits such as mangoes, papayas, lemons, limes, and bright-red West Indian cherries. Acres of banana plantations, pineapple fields, and waving sugarcane stretch to the horizon. The towering mountains and verdant rain forest in the north lure hikers, while underwater sights and sunken treasures attract snorkelers and scuba divers. Martinique is also wonderful if your idea of exercise is turning over every 10 minutes to get an even tan and your taste in adventure runs to duty-free shopping.

Castries, Saint Lucia
With a lush interior featuring towering mountains, dense rain forest, fertile valleys, and acres of banana plantations, St. Lucia is mostly distinguished by the Pitons—twin peaks that soar high above the ocean floor on the southwest coast. Whether you stay in Soufrière, in the north in or around Rodney Bay Village, or even farther north at Cap Estate, exploring the iconic natural sights—and local history—in Soufrière is a day well spent. Except for a small area in the extreme northeast, one main highway circles all of St. Lucia. The road snakes along the coast, cuts across mountains, makes hairpin turns and sheer drops, and reaches dizzying heights. It takes at least four hours to drive the whole loop. Even at a leisurely pace with frequent sightseeing stops, and whether you’re driving or being driven, the curvy roads make it a tiring drive in a single outing.

Jost Van Dyke, British Virgin Islands
Jost Van Dyke, four miles long, is truly known as the 'barefoot island'. The smallest of the British Virgin Islands, it is known as a popular destination for yachts and is celebrated for its casual lifestyle, protected anchorages, fine beaches and beachfront restaurants and bars. The island has fewer than 200 inhabitants and they are widely known as a welcoming people. The island's name conjures up its rich, colorful past. Jost Van Dyke is said to have been named for an early Dutch settler, a former pirate. At Great Harbour, Little Harbour, and White Bay there are safe, protected bays and pristine beaches shaded with coconut palms and seagrape trees. Discover inviting shops selling local treasures, restaurants, and bars.

Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos Islands
Just 7 miles (11 km) long and a little more than 1 mile (1½ km) wide, this island, the capital and seat of the Turks and Caicos government, has been a longtime favorite destination for divers eager to explore the 7,000-foot-deep pristine coral walls that drop down only 300 yards out to sea. On shore, the tiny, quiet island is home to white-sand beaches, the National Museum, and a small population of wild horses and donkeys, which leisurely meander past the white-walled courtyards, pretty churches, and bougainvillea-covered colonial inns on their daily commute into town. But things aren't entirely sleepy: a cruise-ship complex at the southern end of the island brings about 600,000 visitors per year. That said, the dock is self-contained and is about 3 miles (5 km) from the tranquil, small hotels of Cockburn Town, Pillory Beach, and the Ridge and far from most of the western-shore dive sites.

Fort Lauderdale, Florida, US
Like many southeast Florida neighbors, Fort Lauderdale has long been revitalizing. In a state where gaudy tourist zones often stand aloof from workaday downtowns, Fort Lauderdale exhibits consistency at both ends of the 2-mile Las Olas corridor. The sparkling look results from upgrades both downtown and on the beachfront. Matching the downtown's innovative arts district, cafés, and boutiques is an equally inventive beach area, with hotels, cafés, and shops facing an undeveloped shoreline, and new resort-style hotels replacing faded icons of yesteryear. Despite wariness of pretentious overdevelopment, city leaders have allowed a striking number of glittering high-rises. Nostalgic locals and frequent visitors fret over the diminishing vision of sailboats bobbing in waters near downtown; however, Fort Lauderdale remains the yachting capital of the world, and the water toys don’t seem to be going anywhere.
Sailing Dates
  • 25 Mar 2021
Itinerary

Cruise Itinerary

DayDateActivityArriveDepart
1 25/03 San Juan, Puerto Rico 06:00 PM
2 26/03 St Kitts & Nevis 09:00 AM 06:00 PM
3 27/03 Forte de France, Martinique 08:00 AM 11:00 PM
4 28/03 Bequia, St Vincent & The Grenadines 08:00 AM 11:00 PM
5 29/03 St Georges, Grenada 08:00 AM 10:00 PM
6 30/03 Castries, St Lucia 08:00 AM 04:00 PM
7 31/03 Gustavia, St Barts 09:00 AM 11:00 PM
8 01/04 Jost Van Dyke, British Virgin Islands 08:00 AM 10:00 PM
9 02/04 At sea    
10 03/04 Grand Turk, Turks & Caicos 08:00 AM 05:00 PM
11 04/04 At sea    
12 05/04 Ft Lauderdale (Pt Everglades), USA 07:00 AM
All itineraries and ports of call at the discretion of the cruise line subject to local weather conditions and may change without notice.

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